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IS YOUR CREDIT SCORE HIGHER THAN YOU THINK?

COMMON CREDIT SCORE MISCONCEPTIONS


It is common to assume that paying bills on time automatically translates into a high credit score. Unfortunately, that's not always the case.

Knowing how your credit score is calculated can help you make better decisions about your credit. At a minimum, you should be aware of these common misperceptions:

I ALWAYS PAY MY BILLS ON TIME SO I MUST HAVE A HIGH CREDIT SCORE.

Paying your bills on time is clearly a critical factor, but it only accounts for 35 percent of your overall FICO score [the most popular credit scoring system]. It also looks at four other components: the amount of debt you owe (30%); the length of your credit history (15%); the number of credit accounts you've recently opened (10%); and the types of credit you use (10%).

CONDENSING MULTIPLE CREDIT CARDS WILL INCREASE MY SCORE.

Consolidating credit cards could make it easier to pay down debt, but your FICO score could actually decrease if you consolidate to fewer accounts with balances that are closer to the maximum available credit. FICO considers you a lower risk if you have multiple credit accounts, keep the payments up-to-date, and maintain balances between 25 percent and 35 percent of the available credit.

I DON'T HAVE ANY CREDIT CARDS OR OTHER MAJOR DEBT SO I CAN'T HAVE A LOW SCORE.

Your FICO score doesn't take into account your net worth or your income level it only looks at your past borrowing history. Your FICO score will be lower if you haven't established a long-term borrowing history with multiple creditors.

CLOSING A CREDIT CARD IS BETTER FOR MY SCORE THAN KEEPING IT OPEN.

Closing a credit card will not necessarily hurt your score in the short term, but you will eventually lose the positive effects of any long-term credit history that you've established with that lender.

I SHOULDN'T SHOP AROUND FOR A MORTGAGE OR OTHER LARGE LOAN BECAUSE CREDIT INQUIRIES HURT MY SCORE.

A large number of credit inquiries will lower your score, but FICO is smart enough to know when you are rate shopping. Inquiries for similar types of credit are bundled if they're made within the same 14-day period.

I SHOULDN'T CHECK MY CREDIT REPORT MORE THAN ONCE A YEAR BECAUSE CREDIT INQUIRIES HURT MY SCORE.

Checking your own credit report does not affect your score, so feel free to check it as many times as you'd like.

If you want to learn more about how FICO scores are calculated, visit Fair Isaac's web site at www.myfico.com for a host of informational materials and credit score tips. And while you're at it, you can also order your score for a small fee.

 

To learn more about me, email me at Don@DonSellsHomes.com or call anytime at 339-927-2759.